Thyme

Thymus vulgaris

The origin of the name "Thyme" has been traced to two possible sources.  Thymus is a Greek name for "courage," but to the Greeks it also meant "to fumigate."  It has been used through the centuries as a remedy for many ailments, from epilepsy to melancholy.  Nowadays, it is prescribed by herbalists for intestinal worms, gastrointestinal ailments, bronchial problems, laryngitis, diarrhea, and lack of appetite.  It has antiseptic properties, and can be used as a mouthwash, skin cleanser, anti-fungal agent for athlete's foot and as an anti-parasitic for lice, scabies, and crabs.  For skin inflammations and sores, make a poultice by mashing the leaves into a paste.

To use Thyme as an anti-fungal agent or as a parasitic, mix four ounces of Thyme to a pint of alcohol, or buy the essential oil and use sparingly on the affected area.  For bronchitis and gastric problems, make a tea to be used once per day.  Add honey as a sweetener, if desired.

The essential oil of Thyme (Thymol) can cause adverse reactions if taken in it's pure form, so use Thyme-based medications sparingly.  If taken in a tea, drink only once or twice per day, and if used on the skin, be aware that it may cause irritation.