Chives

Allium schoenoprasum

Edible Uses

Flowers and leaves have a mild onion like flavor. Sprinkle flowers on salads or add to vinegars. Add leaves to sandwiches, soups and cream sauces. Use to make flavored butter.

It is a great improvement to salads - cut fresh and chopped fine - and may be put not only into green salads, but also into cucumber salad, or sprinkled on sliced tomatoes.

Chives are also excellent in savoury omelettes, and may be chopped and boiled with potatoes that are to be mashed, or chopped fresh and sprinkled, just before serving, on mashed potatoes, both as a garnish and flavouring. They may also be put into soup, either dried, or freshly cut and finely chopped, and are a welcome improvement to homemade sausages, croquettes, etc., as well as an excellent addition to beefsteak puddings and pies.

Chives are also useful for cutting up and mixing with the food of newly-hatched turkeys.

Medicinal Uses

Chives are used to stimulate appetite and promote digestion, especially when poor appetite is due to a cold. Chives are added liberally to salads and cooked dishes for medicinal purposes. Like onions, garlic and leeks, chives contain health-promoting compounds that are believed to help prevent cancer and treat high blood pressure.

Both the leaves and the flowers are used. Chopped fresh or dried leaves are added liberally to salads or cooked foods to stimulate appetite. Chives may also be added to herbal vinegars as part of a healthy diet. Herbal Vinegar: In a blender combine fresh chives leaves and vinegar until blended. Bottle and store for 2 weeks before using. After 2 weeks, strain out herbs if desired. Use herbal vinegars on salads and vegetable dishes.